View Cart (0 items)
Chemical

Study links phthalate to childhood obesity

June 27, 2012
/ Print / Reprints /
| Share More
/ Text Size+

HOUSTON — Obese children show greater exposure than nonobese children to di-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP), a chemical used to soften plastics in some children’s toys and many household products, according to a new study, which found that the obesity risk increases according to the level of the chemical found in the bloodstream.

The study will be presented Saturday at The Endocrine Society’s 94th Annual Meeting in Houston.

DEHP is a common type of phthalate, a group of industrial chemicals that are suspected endocrine disruptors, or hormone-altering agents.

In the study, children with the highest DEHP levels had nearly five times the odds of being obese compared with children who had the lowest DEHP levels, study co-author Mi Jung Park, MD, PhD, said.

“Although this study cannot prove causality between childhood obesity and phthalate exposure, it alerts the public to recognize the possible harm and make efforts to reduce this exposure, especially in children,” said Park, a pediatric endocrinologist in Seoul, Korea, at Sanggye Paik Hospital and professor at Inje University College of Medicine.

Phthalates are found in some pacifiers, plastic food packages, medical equipment and building materials such as vinyl flooring, and even in nonplastic personal care products, including soap, shampoo and nail polish.

READ MORE:

Common chemical may disrupt children’s mental development

Congress wary of plastics used in toys, bottles

You must login or register in order to post a comment.

Related Events