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Sanitation

EDGE Outreach installs water sanitation system at hospital in India

June 11, 2012
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LOUISVILLE, Ky. -- A team from EDGE Outreach, a Louisville-based organization that provides clean drinking water to developing communities and disaster environments around the world, just completed the installation of a water sanitation system at Bethany Hospital in Shillong, N.E. India, where hundreds of medical staff and patients will now have access to clean water. Kurtis T. Daniels, Vice-President and Director of Training & Field Operations for EDGE, led the team that worked closely with hospital engineering staff and locals to train them on maintenance of their existing iron removal system and the installation of two EDGE M-100 Chlorine Generators. The two water sanitation systems will provide Bethany Hospital with up to 60,000 liters of safe water each day, making this the largest single-site project ever completed by EDGE.

Previously, the hospital''s water source was not being treated properly and it was being stored in a contaminated concrete cistern full of iron particulate. After completing testing and gathering data, Daniels supervised the cleaning and repairs of the hospital''s existing equipment. The 14'' long x 12'' wide x 14'' deep concrete cistern was emptied, cleaned and inspected. Then, the team was able to refill the cistern with water and "shock" chlorinate the cistern with chlorine generated by the two new M-100 Chlorine Generators, using salt (sodium chloride) purchased locally in Shillong, N.E. India and two 240v AC / 12v DC transformers.

"I was invited to Bethany Hospital to consult with the staff leaders about some of their water issues, and it quickly became apparent that they were not using their iron removal system as it was designed to be used," says Daniels. "After a few days of evaluating the situation and researching solutions, I came up with a plan and discussed it with David Sailo, Hospital Administrator, and his father Dr. John Sailo, Hospital Owner. They were both very excited about the simplicity of the solution, and wanted to know if it was possible to pull off the plan in my remaining time in India. My answer was yes of course, so we got started right away. If I needed labor, an electrician, a welder, or anything else, they would arrange for it to happen within the hour. The Sailos realized the impact safe water would have in the hospital, so we all worked hard for eight days to make it happen."

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