Global Processing

DuPont breaks ground on cellulosic ethanol facility

December 3, 2012

NEVADA, Iowa — DuPont broke ground Friday on a new cellulosic ethanol facility in Nevada, Iowa, which the company believes brings it one step closer to commercializing advanced biofuels.

Expected to be completed in mid-2014, the $200 million facility will be among the first and largest commercial-scale cellulosic biorefineries in the world.

The new facility is expected to generate 30 million gallons annually of cellulosic biofuel produced from corn stover residues, a non-food feedstock that consists of corn stalks and leaves. This is more capacity than original estimates called for as data derived from DuPont’s piloting facility in Tennessee has allowed it to further optimize its process and technology.

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“Nearly a decade ago, DuPont set out to develop innovative technology that would result in low capital and low-cost cellulosic ethanol production. We recognized that science-powered innovation was the catalyst to make cellulosic ethanol a commercial reality and to help reduce global dependence on fossil fuels,” said James C. Collins, president, DuPont Industrial Biosciences.

Collins was joined by Iowa Gov. Terry Branstad to celebrate the official beginning of construction on the facility at a ceremony held at the construction site adjacent to grain ethanol facility Lincolnway Energy.

“During my previous terms as governor, we were excited to bring ethanol production to the state. After many hard years of work by Iowa growers and technology companies like DuPont, Iowa now leads the country in renewable fuel production,” said Branstad. “This site in Nevada is the next critical step in our cellulosic ethanol journey. We look forward to bringing these advanced technologies online, creating local jobs and helping to deliver clean, sustainable energy.”