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Water/Waste Processing e-News

Researchers examine what feeds Florida red tide

A major study that brings together five years' worth of research on Florida red tides shows that the organism that causes the phenomenon has more flexible biology than previously understood.
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US water use reaches lowest level in 45 years

The latest figures on water use in the United States show that conservation efforts are having an impact.
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Streamflow conditions across North America available on new portal

A new website provides information on streamflow conditions throughout much of North America.
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Microbes in saturated forest soil help remove nitrogen from groundwater

Waterlogged areas in forests play an important role in the quality of groundwater, new research has shown.
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Researchers classify microplastic particles in wastewater

A German study has confirmed that conventional methods used at wastewater treatment plants do not completely eliminate microplastics.
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Ammonium levels in ocean lower than previously thought

Researchers examined two years of rainwater samples taken in Bermuda, measuring the amount of ammonium and specific isotopes of nitrogen in the ammonium, to ascertain the source.
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New York State awards grants to improve water quality

The governor of New York has authorized grants that will fund local and regional projects to improve water quality across the state.
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Resorting wetlands reduces soil subsidence, greenhouse gas emissions

Restoring lost and degraded wetlands to their natural state is a key part of efforts to ensure the health of America's watershed, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
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August floods in Michigan caused 10 billion gallons to overflow from sewers

Torrential rain and flooding in southeast Michigan this summer washed almost 10 billion gallons of untreated wastewater into local lakes and rivers.
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New method detects toxic algae traces in drinking water

A Ph.D. student at Lund University in Sweden has developed a new technique for detecting very small traces of toxic algae blooms, or cyanobacteria, in drinking water.
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